My books

Someone asked about my books. As I have noted on Facebook, I am cataloguing my books via Librarything. You can see them here, I think:

http://www.librarything.com/home#

look for member: DavidPowell

 

You may have to join LT, but if you can join for free if you store less than 200 books, which means that you can sign up and see other member libraries at no cost.

 

let me know if it works…

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23 Responses to “My books”

  1. jfepperson Says:

    We need your password to look at your collection, I think, and I suspect you don’t want to give that away.

    • Dave Powell Says:

      No, I can look at other members collections without their passwords. If I go to the homepage, then hit “connections” I get a list of members, and I can click on those names to see their libraries. What I _haven’t_ figured out is how to find a _specific_ member. This new learning amazes, me, Sir Bedevere…

  2. mitchell werksman Says:

    Thanks dave,as i am a member i was able to find your library fairly easily.the 37 books on chickamauqa was interesting to go over.i thank you as this will give me alot more reading.i haveBradley S. Keefer,s book “Conflicting Memories on the River Of Death” which i thought was a really great book as i learned an awful lot and it was a really pleasant read.well worth the investment.hope to see and meet you at the 150th Chickamauqa….mitcj

    • Dave Powell Says:

      Mitch, I reviewed Mr. Keefer’s book for a forthcoming issue of Blue and Gray. I was really taken with how much the park was effected by the Spanish American encampment, and how much had to be set to rights afterwards. It is a very good book. Dave

  3. Louis Mosier Says:

    Dave, I joined LibraryThing for free, no problem. I noticed you don’t list the “History of the Services of the Third Battery Wisconsin Light Artillery in the Civil War of the United States, 1861-65” in your library. You might be interested in its sections on Stones River, Chickamauga and Chattanooga. It’s a rather small history compiled in 1902 after one of their reunions, but might contain a few nuggets.

    • Dave Powell Says:

      Thanks, Louis. I have yet to list excerpts and digital collections, which is why I don’t show it, but I do have a copy of the pertinent stuff. but I do appreciate the heads up. Dave

  4. jfepperson Says:

    OK, got it! Is “Confederate Veteran” digitized anywhere?

  5. Stephen Graham Says:

    You should identify yourself as a LibraryThing author.

  6. Nathan Towne Says:

    Dave,

    Have you purchased the new biography of T.J. Wood published in November of 2012 by McFarland? Along with the McCook biography, I am waiting until the price comes down somewhat to pick up a copy. Also, it is only available in paperback and I prefer hardcover, but that isn’t the end of the world. The author, Dan Lee, is also Lovell Rousseau’s biographer. I have a copy of that book but I have not yet had the chance to pick it up. Finally, when looking at the endnotes I noticed fairly quickly that he synthesized quite a few secondary sources which isn’t neccasarily a bad thing but did catch my attention.

    If anyone has read it, I would be interested in your take.
    http://www.amazon.com/Thomas-J-Wood-Biography-General/dp/0786471301/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1373900155&sr=1-1&keywords=thomas+j.+wood+a+biography+of+the+union+general+in+the+civil+war

    Thanks,
    Nathan Towne

    • Dave Powell Says:

      I have the Wood and the McCook biographies. I just reviewed Wood for Blue and Gray Magazine. They are good if not by any means definitive. They do rely heavily on secondary sources, but for all of that, the books do have some useful insights.

      If I were you I would wait and try and get them through ILL or the used market. McFarland books are very pricey, especially for paperbacks.

      Dave

      • Nathan Towne Says:

        Dave,

        I certainly will wait to see if any used copies come down a little bit in price on Amazon before I bite the bullet and purchase them. I will definitely have to check out your review of the T.J. Wood bio though in Blue and Gray.

        Nathan Towne

  7. Chris Evans Says:

    Dave,

    A worthy novel that you may have read that involves many of the characters that figure in the Chickamauga story is ‘Bright Starry Banner: A Novel of the Civil War’ by Alden R. Carter from 2003 about the Battle of Stones River.

    I find it quite good since so little fiction or non fiction has been written about Stones River. Some of his characterizations of the Generals of both times is pretty jarring. Leonidas Polk is portrayed as a perfectly horrid character, for example.

    I like that Juluis Garesche is portrayed as he is to me a completely forgotten figure of the war and Ambrose Bierce is used extensively to show the grotesqueness of the war.

    I would recommend it to readers as it is quite a excellent blend of fact and fiction and some of the portrayals of Generals on both sides is fascinating

    I have always hoped the author would continue his story with a similar novel on Chickamauga.

    I just thought I’d bring it to your attention as giant novels on Western Theater battles don’t really grow on trees.

    Chris

    • Nathan Towne Says:

      Chris,

      There is a brand new biography of Leonidas Polk, published in January of 2013 by “The History Press” and written by an author named Cheryl White. I browsed through the preview of the book on google books however and I am not at all impressed. There is essentially no military detail, the entire Chickamauga campaign is covered in a single sentence, the Meridian expedition goes without mention and the entire 1864 Georgia campaign up through Polk’s death is covered in a single paragraph. I am not sure if her book has value or not, but as far as military history is concerned it doesn’t seem to be very helpful, to say the least.

      Furthermore, with existing material on Polk I am extremely confused as to what her intent was. With modern studies by Joseph Parks and Glenn Robbins that completely dwarf her book in research and coverage I am somewhat baffled as to the point of her book.

      Nathan Towne

      • Chris Evans Says:

        I had noticed that book.

        Thanks for the heads up on how terrible it is.

        Chris

      • Nathan Towne Says:

        Chris,

        Of course. I don’t know how much coverage she devoted to Polk’s clerical career however as I didn’t really delve into that section of the Google books preview. As for its coverage of Polk’s Confederate service however, it is totally inadequate.

        Nathan Towne

      • Chris Evans Says:

        Thanks again for the info.

        You should really read Alden Carter’s version of the Bishop. I know it is pretty much from his imagination but it is undoubtedly colorful and twisted.

        I think if the Bishop had ever read how he is portrayed he would have sued for libel.

        I like the novel though because the many characters that are important at Stones River and Chickamauga really are brought to life and are not cardboard cutouts. I think it has sort of been overlooked in Western Theater Civil War literature because even though it is a novel it is one of the longest accounts of that strange campaign.

        Chris

      • Nathan Towne Says:

        Chris,

        I appreciate the reference. I am not very familiar with the historical fiction on the American Civil War era but I will certainly check it out. He covers the Murfreesboro campaign? How does he portray Polk?

        Nathan Towne

      • Chris Evans Says:

        Yes, the campaign and battle is the focus of the book at over 400 pages. He goes from Generals to the privates in the ranks. He even follows individual regiments. He seems to portray the Union side in a better light than the Confederate. Of course, McCook and Crittenden come in for a whipping in their portrayals.

        I think the battle scenes are excellent depictions of Civil War combat. The book needed more maps, though.

        Polk is basically portrayed as a hypocrite. That despite being a religious man and Bishop that he enjoyed the killing. That the only thing he enjoyed more than the killing was hating Bragg.

        Hardee is portrayed as a womanizer and also a giant Bragg hater. Cleburne is Hardee’s protege and is shown as a killing machine leader.

        Bragg is shown as the ultimate grouch. In ill health and with a terrible stomach always a depressing personality to be around.

        Many other leaders are shown also: Thomas, Sill, Sheridan, etc. I think the author did his homework. I find these depictions fascinating if not always agreeing with them.

        I would also recommend for excellent Western Theater Civil War fiction: ‘The Black Flower’, ‘Year of Jubilo’, and ‘The Judas Field’. They contain awesome descriptions of the Army of Tennessee and the Battle of Franklin.

        Chris

      • Chris Evans Says:

        The author of the last three named novels is Howard Bahr.

        Chris

      • Nathan Towne Says:

        I will certainly check it out.

        Nathan Towne

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